Wednesday, December 05, 2007

Go Lower


Yo. A holler to put this mix on yer radar if it ain't already.



It's a mix by them Faggerrttttronixxx boys over at Lower End Spasm for FACT magazine, and it's got the FLEX! Go grab it now.

The tasty grime / Niche / Bmore tracklist includes some Dexplicit and Radioclit, an edit/megamix of Skepta riddims, and three tracks involving Drop The Lime (some under the Curses! alias). It's really pretty satisfying to see that DTL's getting the attention he deserves - me and the Bomb have been talking for a while now about how anyday soon his sound is gonna go overground all of a sudden. That 16year-old girl on the back of the late bus'll be playing Curses! mpfrees off her Nokia6320. Judging by the reactions to the recent T&B sets at Fabric, the time is not long.

And he's long overdue more credit; the man is working HARD, putting out remixes and tracks non-stop. There's also something enticing about his own output - there's that lingering feeling for the dedicated listener that they've witnessed something a little bit intimate, a slice of something personal just-revealed, and it's those tentative suggestions that we're being allowed to share something private that makes us come back for more. It's not all about the trouble and bass all of the time.

Finally, the mix ends with the Boy 8-Bit's simple remix of Burial's 'Archangel', the track off the much-blogged Untrue LP that has the most euphoric rave vocal of them all. The remix is grabbable from discobelle, where they astutely observe that it's a very basic addition of a very basic electro beat, just intended to give more of a dancefloor vibe to this hypnotic track. Jace Rupture just pointed out that such remixing decisions are overused. Yup, guilty as charged with that Kisssss remix from the last post I just did. I guess when it comes to making decisions, there's a problem with falling back on borrowing the tropes of the time.

Blackdown laments that major dubstep artists have had to make such quick decisions because their scene's got them so busy that they haven't been able to work at their ideas, or the articulation of their ideas. They just deliver the goods, what's expected of them, all the right noises in the right sort of order. Nothing that intimate getting out. You start thinking of audiences as having a rather stupid herd mentality - just push the button and they flip out; don't push the button and they leave unsatisfied, and prefer the next guy who did press the button. We know that a scene's increasing popularity increases the contempt its admirers had for it - that's just backlash economics. But what a shame if popularity causes the artists to disparage the scene - perhaps that's part of what happened with Dizzee. Lets hope it doesn't happen with DTL, cos he's going up there.